Jonathan Master
Primary or Secondary Importance? Jonathan and James are enjoying a conversation about doctrines of primary and secondary importance. What are these doctrines, and how may we distinguish them? Can our clear understanding of certain doctrines help us determine their importance? Our hosts...Continue reading.
Tim Bertolet
In this brief essay, I’d like to take a moment and introduce you to a sermon by Archibald Alexander entitled “Nature and Means of Growth in Grace” and commend it to your reading and spiritual profit. When we look at the life and legacy that men such as Alexander have left for us, we are quickly...Continue reading.
Jeffrey Waddington
Archibald Alexander (1772-1851) was the first and founding professor at Princeton Theological Seminary, which began in 1812. Prior to being appointed to this post Alexander had been president of Hampton-Sydney College in Virginia and he served as pastor of Third Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia...Continue reading.
James Garretson
Godly mentors are an important influence on Christian character formation. This is especially true for men called to the work of the pastoral ministry. And among the names of those who served as exemplary mentor-professors at Princeton Theological Seminary in its early years is that of Archibald...Continue reading.
Jonathan Master
This week on Theology on the Go, Dr. Jonathan Master is joined by Dr. James M. Garretson. Dr. Garretson is an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church in America. He has pastored congregations in the Orthodox Presbyterian Church and the Presbyterian Church in America, and taught at Knox...Continue reading.
Grant Van Leuven
Just as it revives the Body of Christ when schooled in the classic theology and pious character of the good old Puritans, so we may be renewed by “going old school” with The Log College. Considering that the prominent eighteenth century evangelist George Whitfield referred to what would later be...Continue reading.
David Calhoun
Before Princeton Theological Seminary was founded in 1812, John Witherspoon, the sixth president of Princeton College, wrote in the Form of Government of the Presbyterian Church: “Truth is in order to goodness, and the great touchstone of truth, its tendency to promote holiness.” Continue reading.
David Calhoun
Princeton Seminary’s history began during the early part of the “great century” of missions. From its beginning the seminary supported and promoted the world-wide missionary cause. The first professors—Archibald Alexander, Samuel Miller, and Charles Hodge—were early and strong advocates of world...Continue reading.
David Calhoun
On August 12, 1812, people crowded into the Presbyterian Church in Princeton, New Jersey, for the inauguration of Archibald Alexander as the first professor of a new school—a theological seminary. The sermon of the day was given by Samuel Miller, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of New York...Continue reading.
David Calhoun
On the last New Year’s day of his life, Charles Hodge was visited by one of the seminary students, who asked for a motto. The old man wrote in a firm hand and with large letters, “Thy word is truth.”Continue reading.
Jonathan Master
This week on Theology on the Go, Dr. Jonathan Master is joined by Dr. David Calhoun, who is Emeritus Professor of Church History at Covenant Theological Seminary, St Louis, Missouri. He has taught at Covenant College and Columbia Bible College (now Columbia International University) and served as...Continue reading.

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