Jonathan Master
When studying the history of the Church, we tend to jump from the apostolic era right to the third century and beyond, where theological controversies were taking shape and ecumenical councils were being called. ...Continue reading.
Tim Bertolet
As we think about the Trinity and seek to grow in our understanding of this Biblical doctrine, it is always helpful to use resources of others who have spent more time thinking about the Trinity. To this end, I would like to recommend Robert Letham’s book The Holy Trinity: In Scripture, History,...Continue reading.
David Smith
Warfield denies that the doctrine can be proven or grasped by human reason alone; there are no analogies for it, because “in his Trinitarian mode of being” God is utterly unique (135). Yet, the history of theology is marked by failed attempts to prove it. These provide a negative support to the...Continue reading.
Rachel Miller
The doctrine of the Trinity is one of the essential doctrines of Christianity. At its most basic definition, the Trinity means that there is one God in three persons: Father, Son, and Spirit. From the time of the early church, Christians have been attempting to explain how God can be both “one” and...Continue reading.
John Hartley
At the risk of sounding cheeky, Michael Reeves’ book, Delighting in the Trinity (IVPress, 2012) is delightful. It is the kind of book that should be reviewed annually, as if it had just been published. It is that fresh; already carrying about it the air of a classic. Continue reading.
Jonathan Master
Last time our hosts discussed why one must study theology. Now Jonathan and James give practical tools to do just that in the form of book recommendations. These will encourage us to see the importance of the doctrine of God. They will also teach us something about contemplative theology and gazing...Continue reading.
Jeffrey Stivason
Recently, I was reading John Murray’s commentary on the book of Romans. I was struck by what I read. In Romans 4:3 we read, “Abraham believed God, and it was counted to him as righteousness.” Now, we know that our faith is not the ground of our justification but this is what Murray said,Continue reading.
Jeffrey Stivason
Benjamin B. Warfield wrote a little article for the Homiletic Review in 1897 titled, "The Indispensableness of Systematic Theology to the Preacher." As anything written by Warfield, it is a thoughtful and edifying piece with a clear aim. According to the Lion of Old Princeton, it is...Continue reading.
Tim Bertolet
What comes to mind when you hear the words “systematic theology”? For many Christians, they think of the halls of academia and the debating of obscure and minor details related to God. But for most of the history of the church, systematic theology was a discipline done for the church and by...Continue reading.
Stephen Unthank
The Westminster Confession of Faith begins with what many have deemed some of the most well articulated statements concerning the doctrine of Scripture. And incorporated right into the confession’s understanding of Scripture is a brief, little clause on how one might do theology. The clause, which...Continue reading.
Grant Van Leuven
If all your paperwork rolled like a sea over your desk, you’d struggle to navigate and prepare your tax returns. If you blanketed your computer’s desktop with all your digital files, you’d smother the writing of a departmental report. So is any unorganized library a maze of confusion.Continue reading.
Jonathan Master
Theology on the Go starts the new year with an exciting announcement. Jonathan Master is pleased to introduce his new regular co-host Dr. James Dolezal. James is not only Jonathan’s friend but also a colleague at Cairn University where he teaches trinitarian theology, church history, and philosophy.Continue reading.
John Hartley
The 17th century minister and Scotsman, Alexander Nisbet said, “the most dangerous heretics have many followers; every error they introduce turns out to be a friend to some lust in the heart of man.” Case in point: Several years ago, a friend of mine discovered his pastor had committed adultery...Continue reading.
Stephen Unthank
As an earlier post from Jeff Stivason made clear, this current installment of “Theology for Everyone” was inspired by Martin Luther’s fantastic little book on prayer entitled A Simple Way to Pray. In the spirit of truly offering theology to everyone, let me also recommend R.C. Sproul’s magnificent...Continue reading.
Grant Van Leuven
Let us recognize in witnessing the Gospel to people who identify themselves within the LGBT community that a major part of our conversation should deal with one’s deep commitment to an identity, not only of his or her person, but also being part of a people. We see its manifestation also in...Continue reading.
Jeffrey Waddington
The surging waves of the sexual revolution continue to crash on the shores of our culture and threaten to wash the Christian church, supporting institutions, and believing individuals and their families out to sea. This is not really new. While scholars often point to the 50s and especially the 60s...Continue reading.
David Smith
Unspoken assumptions make the argument. Debates become fruitful when unspoken assumptions get clarified. Many of us are accustomed to calling these assumptions presuppositions—controlling beliefs that determine how we think. In a culture that has largely accepted the belief that the only thing that...Continue reading.
Jeffrey Stivason
Over the last several years, some in the church have argued that a person may be oriented toward homosexuality but not act on the inclination or tendency. That may or may not be the case. However, the burden of this article is not that. In this article, I will demonstrate that to claim that...Continue reading.
Jonathan Master
This week on Theology on the Go we are replaying an old conversation between our host, Dr. Jonathan Master and Dr. Rosaria Champagne Butterfield. Dr. Butterfield is a former tenured professor of English and women’s studies at Syracuse University, converted to Christ in 1999 in what she describes as...Continue reading.
Rachel Miller
It's somewhat ironic for me to be writing an article on helping children love church history. I love church history, and that's part of why I studied history in college. But when I was a child, I hated history. I argued with my parents about why I had to waste my time on such a pointless...Continue reading.
Jeffrey Waddington
I am an avid history reader. I have been since about the age of five. That’s 48 years of history reading. I became an avid church history reader when I came to faith in Christ in 1983. Since then church history, among all sorts of historical works, has been a staple part of my reading diet. As a...Continue reading.
Persis Lorenti
When I was in elementary school, I discovered the joy of reading biographies. In my mind's eye, I can still see the shelf containing a series about important figures in American history. I loved the stories and was disappointed when I finished the last book. First impressions leave a mark, so...Continue reading.
Amy Mantravadi
Why should history have to make a case for itself? No one questions why we should study mathematics or science. The humanities are always having to justify their existence in a way that is not expected of other disciplines. Even so, I do not mind the question—either as a writer of historical...Continue reading.
David Smith
The first day of creation consisted in God creating day and night. God created light and distinguished it from darkness. God created history and filled it with the objects he created, sustains and perfects. What we call “history” is dependent on God, both for its existence, purpose and outcome...Continue reading.
Jonathan Master
This week on Theology on the Go, Dr. Jonathan Master is joined by Simonetta Carr. Simonetta is an award-winning author. She was born in Italy and has lived and worked in different cultures. She worked first as elementary school teacher and then as home-schooling mother for many years. Besides...Continue reading.
Jeffrey Stivason
You are a pastor in a small city. You’ve known your barber for almost twenty years. One day while he trims he asks for help in prayer. He, like many others, struggles in that area. So, you decide to go home and write a brief thirty-four page guide for him. You even incorporate your friend in...Continue reading.

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